Posted by sarah on Sep 02, 2018
The Polio Plus Committee held a meeting to brief the polio officers about their role in the “End Polio Campaign” on 11th August 2018 at Shanghai Restaurant in Kampala, Uganda. It was attended by members of the Polio Plus Committee, various Polio officers from different clubs, officials from the World Health Organisation (WHO), Ministry of Health and Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA).
Mr. Eddy Ssemwanga from Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) informed the participants that a   number of informal settlements in Kampala are prone to polio infection due to over population, poor sanitation, lack of information about polio and resistance. They include: Kisenyi, Makindye, Ggaba, Kisugu, Kasanvu, Kanyogoga, Namuwongo, Kalerwe, Bwaise, Kimwanyi Zone, Sebina Zone in Wandegeya among others.
 
Dr. Annet Kisakye from the World Health Organisation (WHO) highlighted key facts about Polio:
 
Facts about Polio:
  1. Polio is an infection caused by a virus that affects the entire body, including muscles and nerves.
  2. There are 3 types of polio: non-paralytic (does not lead to paralysis), spinal-paralytic (can result in the paralysis of one or more limbs), and bulbar (can result in weak muscles, reflex loss, and respiratory problems).
  3. Up to 95% of polio cases show no symptoms. A small number of people may have fever, sore throat, headache, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or diarrhea.
  4. 1 in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis (usually of the legs). Among those paralyzed, 5 to 10% of patients die when breathing muscles become immobilized.
  5. The virus is found in saliva and feces of sick people. It can be spread by direct contact with sick persons or through the air when a sick person talks, coughs, or sneezes. It is also spread by food, water, or hands contaminated with infected feces.
  6. Polio can infect a person of any age, but children five and under are especially vulnerable and make up roughly 50% of polio victims.
What can a Polio Officer do?
 
  1. Establish a Model Rotary Immunization Center for your club.
  2. Increase service delivery points.
  3. Develop mechanisms to reach the unreached communities.
  4. Support dissemination of information on polio at club level and communities.
  5. Detect and interrupt all polio virus transmission.
  6. Support and strengthen immunization systems. 
 
 From the meeting, it was resolved that the Polio Officers would do the following:
 
  1. Encourage clubs to contribute towards the polio plus fund. (Collect and remit the monthly TRF to Rotary International)
  2. Organise at least one Polio vaccination activity in a month in one of the high risk areas
  3. Participate in Polio eradication activities whenever called upon
  4. Develop monthly and quarterly reports from their clubs
  5. Organize for Polio immunization and other diseases during Rotary Health days.
 
 
In closure, the Chairperson of the Polio Plus Committee  Pat President   Winnie Kabumbuli  thanked the different stakeholders for attending the meeting and called on them to work as a team to support the “END POLIO CAMPAIGN”
 
Written by Rtn Sarah Nakibuuka
 
Polio Plus Committee Members together with officials from the Ministry of Health and World Health Organization (WHO), Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) with some Polio Officers after the meeting.
 
Polio Plus Committee Members together with officials from the Ministry of Health and World Health Organization (WHO), Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) with some Polio Officers after the meeting.